Posted by on Jul 20, 2014 in Blog, Tech, Tutorials | 0 comments

I have been trying to create a simple daemon in Python, here is a sample code of what I found.

 

Download the code for daemon.py here .

 

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys, os, time, atexit
from signal import SIGTERM

class Daemon:
“””
A generic daemon class.

Usage: subclass the Daemon class and override the run() method
“””
def __init__(self, pidfile, stdin=’/dev/null’, stdout=’/dev/null’, stderr=’/dev/null’):
self.stdin = stdin
self.stdout = stdout
self.stderr = stderr
self.pidfile = pidfile

def daemonize(self):
“””
do the UNIX double-fork magic, see Stevens’ “Advanced
Programming in the UNIX Environment” for details (ISBN 0201563177)
http://www.erlenstar.demon.co.uk/unix/faq_2.html#SEC16
“””
try:
pid = os.fork()
if pid > 0:
# exit first parent
sys.exit(0)
except OSError, e:
sys.stderr.write(“fork #1 failed: %d (%s)\n” % (e.errno, e.strerror))
sys.exit(1)

# decouple from parent environment
os.chdir(“/”)
os.setsid()
os.umask(0)

# do second fork
try:
pid = os.fork()
if pid > 0:
# exit from second parent
sys.exit(0)
except OSError, e:
sys.stderr.write(“fork #2 failed: %d (%s)\n” % (e.errno, e.strerror))
sys.exit(1)

# redirect standard file descriptors
sys.stdout.flush()
sys.stderr.flush()
si = file(self.stdin, ‘r’)
so = file(self.stdout, ‘a+’)
se = file(self.stderr, ‘a+’, 0)
os.dup2(si.fileno(), sys.stdin.fileno())
os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno())
os.dup2(se.fileno(), sys.stderr.fileno())

# write pidfile
atexit.register(self.delpid)
pid = str(os.getpid())
file(self.pidfile,’w+’).write(“%s\n” % pid)

def delpid(self):
os.remove(self.pidfile)

def start(self):
“””
Start the daemon
“””
# Check for a pidfile to see if the daemon already runs
try:
pf = file(self.pidfile,’r’)
pid = int(pf.read().strip())
pf.close()
except IOError:
pid = None

if pid:
message = “pidfile %s already exist. Daemon already running?\n”
sys.stderr.write(message % self.pidfile)
sys.exit(1)

# Start the daemon
self.daemonize()
self.run()

def stop(self):
“””
Stop the daemon
“””
# Get the pid from the pidfile
try:
pf = file(self.pidfile,’r’)
pid = int(pf.read().strip())
pf.close()
except IOError:
pid = None

if not pid:
message = “pidfile %s does not exist. Daemon not running?\n”
sys.stderr.write(message % self.pidfile)
return # not an error in a restart

# Try killing the daemon process
try:
while 1:
os.kill(pid, SIGTERM)
time.sleep(0.1)
except OSError, err:
err = str(err)
if err.find(“No such process”) > 0:
if os.path.exists(self.pidfile):
os.remove(self.pidfile)
else:
print str(err)
sys.exit(1)

def restart(self):
“””
Restart the daemon
“””
self.stop()
self.start()

def run(self):
“””
You should override this method when you subclass Daemon. It will be called after the process has been
daemonized by start() or restart().
“””

And here is an example implementation. It implements the daemon as well as it’s controlling client. Simply invoke this script with start, stop or restart as it’s first argument.  Download this file.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys, time
from daemon import Daemon

class MyDaemon(Daemon):
def run(self):
while True:
time.sleep(1)

if __name__ == “__main__”:
daemon = MyDaemon(‘/tmp/daemon-example.pid’)
if len(sys.argv) == 2:
if ‘start’ == sys.argv[1]:
daemon.start()
elif ‘stop’ == sys.argv[1]:
daemon.stop()
elif ‘restart’ == sys.argv[1]:
daemon.restart()
else:
print “Unknown command”
sys.exit(2)
sys.exit(0)
else:
print “usage: %s start|stop|restart” % sys.argv[0]
sys.exit(2)

Source: http://www.jejik.com/articles/2007/02/a_simple_unix_linux_daemon_in_python/